Alcatel brings cost-conscious mobile devices to Africa (IT News Africa)

Alcated has brought two new cost-conscious mobile devices to the African market, the Alcatel Pop Star and the Alcatel Go Play. According to the company, the Alcatel Pop Star will be set to sell at a recommended retail price of R2299 (USD $140 dependent on exchange rate)… While the Alcatel Go Play, which is a more rugged and solid device, will also enter the market at a recommened retail price of R3499 (USD $220 dependent on exchange rate).

By Darryl Linington

Alcatel brings cost-conscious devices to Africa. (Image Source: i.ytimg.com).

At an exclusive preview for the devices Ernst Wittmann, Regional Manager Southern Africa at Alcatel stated that: “We’re excited to bring these devices to Africa in line with our new branding as well as commitment to delivering a diverse set of mobile devices that make the Internet fun, accessible and affordable to all.”

Witmann added that: “The Go Play is intended for the outgoing adventurer while the Pop Star is aimed at the trendy and funky youth of today.”

When taking a look at the devices, we found that the Alcatel Pop Star features a 5-inch HD display with IPS technology for wide viewing angles and detailed images. The Alcatel Pop Star also features 3G+ connectivity and runs on a Quad-core processor.

To add to the specs, the device also features an 8 Mega-Pixel rear camera and a 5 Mega-Pixel front camera. What’s more, the Pop Star has a QR code on the battery cover that gives users access to the Wallpaper Store app, which offers users the ability to personalise their smartphone to match one of the two interchangeable back covers, which are available in Denim and Wood.

When taking a closer look at the more rugged Alcatel Go Play, Alcatel revealed that the device is essentially dust as well as shock resistant (up to 1.5 metres). To add to the features it is also water-resistant; however, this is limited up to 1 metre and the device can be submerged for up to 30-minutes.

As it is a water-resistant device, Alcatel has included an 8 Mega-Pixel rear camera for underwater photography and video recording. In addition to the rear-facing camera, the Alcatel Go Play features a 5 Mega-Pixel front facing camera. The Go Play device, according to the company, allows for 20 days of standby time, 8.5 hours of talk time and 40 hours music playback thanks to the powerful 2500 mAH battery.

Whilst giving an overview of the device, Wittmann added that: “With its sporty features and funky design, Acatel’s Go Play offers something special to the African market. We think it will be a hit with young and young-at-heart people with a playful side.”

According to Witmann, the devices are now available in South Africa, Kenya, and Nigeria.

Read more at IT news Africa

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Africa’s CEOs look to innovation and technology to boost growth (IT News Africa)

Africa remains one of the preferred frontiers for investment opportunities and doing business, according to a report released by PwC Africa. Growth and foreign direct investment has continued in Africa amid the recent global economic uncertainty.

By Staff Writer (IT News Africa)

Africa’s CEOs look to innovation and technology to boost growth. (image credit: accountancyage.com)

This is confirmed by PwC’s Africa Business Agenda survey, which shows that Africa and the emerging markets remain a vital growth opportunity for CEOs. The Africa Business Agenda compiles results from 153 CEOs and includes insights from business and public sector leaders from across Africa.

Hein Boegman, CEO for PwC Africa, says: “CEOs in Africa are ramping up their efforts to innovate and find new ways to do business on the continent in a move to stimulate growth in a challenging and uncertain global business environment.

“The global financial and economic crisis has revealed Africa’s vulnerability to a number of external economic shocks. These include the decline in commodity prices fueled by the economic slowdown in China; a marked decline in the demand for commodities; and the collapse in value of the emerging market currencies against the US-dollar in anticipation of an interest rate hike.

“Notwithstanding a multitude of challenges, many of which are cyclical, we remain confident that Africa’s prospects remain positive. Africa’s business leaders have the opportunity to pursue new business opportunities on the continent, more particularly in the light of rapid innovative and technological advances that have the potential to transform and shape industries.”

Africa’s CEOs are critically aware of these issues and the impact they may on their businesses. CEOs believe global economic growth is unlikely to improve and will stay the same in the short and mid-term; nonetheless they remain confident that there are opportunities for growth over the next 12 months (78%), and 9 out of 10 believe they can deliver growth in the next three years.

The global business environment has become increasingly complex and challenging. The report shows that CEOs in Africa share many of the same concerns with their peers globally. The top three concerns include exchange rate volatility (92%), government response to fiscal deficit and debt burden (90%) and social instability (80%).

CEOs in South Africa have similar concerns as their counterparts on the continent, with the report showing that there are uncertainties about government response to fiscal deficit and debt burden, social instability, and high unemployment or underemployment.

Across the continent, shifting demographics, rapid urbanisation, rising disposable income and technological change are all influencing growth opportunities and strategies. Africa’s CEOs rank technological advances (75%), demographic shifts (52%) and a shift in global economic power (58%) as the top three defining trends that will transform their businesses over the next five years. In addition, new advancements and breakthroughs in frontiers of R&D are opening up more opportunities for businesses.

Our survey of CEOs reveals four common priorities among Africa’s business leaders: diversification and innovation; addressing greater stakeholder expectations; effectively leveraging growth catalysts like technology, innovation and talent; and measuring and communicating shared prosperity.

Catalysts for growth
In Africa, the environment is constantly changing and the growth opportunities are unparalleled. After more than a decade of urbanisation, Africa is poised for a digital revolution. Increasingly, organisations are using technology to challenge business models and disrupt competitors in markets. Technology was seen by CEOs in the survey as the best way of assessing and delivering on customer expectations by implementing customer relationship management systems (69%), interpreting the complex and evolving needs of customers through data and analytics (56%), and improving communication and engagement by means of social media (58%).

Corporate governance has also brought IT to the fore. In South Africa, the draft King IV report recognises that information technology (IT) has become an integral part of doing business today.

Going forward, CEOs in Africa indicated that they will be more actively looking for partners, while keeping an eye on costs. Partnerships and alliances feature prominently in their plans, with more than half of Africa CEOs (56%) planning to enter into strategic alliances over the next 12 months. In addition, 16% say they intend carrying out cross-border merger and acquisition (M&A) activities in the next year. Looking at investment prospects, China (22%), Kenya (22%), Uganda (20%) and South Africa (18%) remain the countries Africa CEOs view as most important for growth in the next 12 months.

While many organisations across the globe are expanding or seeking to expand in Africa, the availability of key skills stands out as a key concern for CEOs both in Africa and South Africa. More than half of Africa’s CEOs expect to increase their headcount over the next year. ‘The talent trends that we are seeing suggest that the market is becoming more and more competitive,” Boegman adds. As a result companies are having to review their talent management strategies. Around half plan to invest more in their leadership pipeline and focus on developing their institutional culture.

Stakeholders’ expectations
Across Africa boardroom agendas are changing, with many additional focus areas being brought to the table. The corporate landscape continues to undergo constant change, with companies being confronted by shareholders and other institutional investors who demand explanations around financial reporting and performance. In the process business is encountering a range of challenges in responding to wider stakeholder expectations. These include: additional costs to doing business (62%), unclear or inconsistent standards or regulations (45%), and customers’ unwillingness to pay (35%).

Dion Shango, CEO for PwC Southern Africa, says: “More successful companies tend to be collaborative and collective in their engagement with stakeholders. Business leaders need to have a business rationale for engaging and collaborating with stakeholders, while being acutely aware of the risks posed by not engaging with all relevant stakeholders.

“One of the most significant benefits of engaging and collaborating with stakeholders is that an organisation may be able to engage new markets in Africa and speed up the introduction of new products and services.”

Trust is also emerging as an important differentiator in the business community. Building trust helps organisations to attract investment and build stakeholder loyalty. It is concerning to note that 65% of Africa CEOs are somewhat or extremely concerned about the lack of trust in business. Corruption is also seen as a major threat by businesses (86%). The private sector has taken the initiative to fight corruption by calling on government and regulators to enforce legislation and codes of business practice.

Communicating shared prosperity
It is positive to note that Africa CEOs are increasingly recognising the importance of reporting on non-financial matters. In addition, most Africa CEOs surveyed not only believe that success is dependent on more than just making money, they also believe that their organisatiions should do more to report on the broader impact of their activities and how these activities create value for stakeholders.

Shango concludes: “Africa and South African CEOs have built on the experience of the past few years and are better prepared to deal with the host of challenges and uncertainties. CEOs have and also continue to reshape their business strategies to take advantage of new opportunities for growth, both in existing and new markets.”

Read More at IT News Africa

The need for Open source skills in Africa (IT News Africa)

With many businesses transitioning from legacy systems to ones built on open source (OS) software, there is a need for skilled employees that can unlock the value this approach offers.

By: Matthew Lee, regional manager for SUSE Africa

Despite the fact that OS skills development is nothing new, the subtle changes in business requirements over the years mean the need has progressed beyond foundational skills. Today, companies are looking for people who have more advanced OS skills reflecting a more dynamic, connected business landscape.

While the market for this in South Africa is relatively small when compared to more developed countries, there is certainly significant potential for growth. As demand for OS-based solutions increase here, and on the rest of the continent, so too will the skills requirement.

According to the 2016 Open Source Jobs Report published earlier this month, 65% of hiring managers say OS hiring will increase more than any other part of their business over the next six months, and 79% of hiring managers have increased incentives to hold on to their current OS professionals.

Furthermore, the report found that 58% of hiring managers are seeking DevOps professionals while the need for developers remains the top position on their list at 74%. Perhaps the most telling statistic is the one that shows that 31% of OS professionals say the best thing about their jobs is working on interesting projects, while working on the most cutting-edge technology challenges (18%) and collaborating with a global community (17%) also feature prominently.

This last point indicates just how far OS has come in the business adoption cycle. No longer just limited to core back-end systems, OS provides decision-makers with a way to manipulate the underlying platform to suit more diverse organisational needs. This link between mission-critical platforms and systems are resulting in an increased demand for the associated skills to extract the most value out of the transition.

However, as with any IT component, there are a dizzying array of skills on offer. While much attention is placed on Linux, this is only one part of the OS offering. Companies need to consider the benefits of attracting talent with skills that talk to open customer relationship management, open databases, the open cloud, and even an open management system.

This is resulting in companies increasingly starting to take OS more seriously from a skills perspective. They understand that new requirements mean they have to adopt revised learning programmes that can encompass the likes of online courses, virtual-led classrooms, and self-paced programmes to enhance their existing OS skill set.

It must be remembered that there is no silver bullet approach to take to strengthen OS skills in the organisation. Decision-makers need to be considered and align their development with the company strategy. The most pressing needs are to start taking those first steps to build in-house capacity or to attract more advanced OS talent. The business world of today and the future demands it.

Read More at IT News Africa 

Watly: The computer that provides clean water, energy, internet access (CNN Africa)

(CNN) Touted by its creators as the “world’s largest solar-powered computer,” it could offer a quantum leap for development across rural Africa.

By Kieron Monks, for CNN

The Watly machine, created by an Italian-Spanish start-up of the same name, resembles a futuristic space capsule. But its mission is to provide electricity, clean water, and Internet services that could transform lives and economies across rural Africa.
Around 625 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa are currently without electricity — more than two-thirds of the population — while 39% lack access to safe water.
“This is an infrastructure solution for people without access to three fundamental pillars of civilization,” says Watly founder Marco Attisani. “We are (taking) people to the heart of the 21st century.”

Patented technology

The system works by capturing solar energy through photovoltaic panels on the surface of the Watly module, which is converted into electricity through an internal 140 kwh battery.
This powers a patented water treatment system that uses a graphene-based filtering process, before the water is boiled and then distilled. The process can deliver 5,000 liters of safe drinking water each day.
The battery also powers a connectivity hub that provides wireless internet access within an 800-meter radius, and a charging station for electronic and mobile devices.
During its 15 years of service, one Watly can reduce emissions to the tune of 2,500 tons of greenhouse gases, equivalent to 5,000 barrels of oil, its makers say.
Watly has already tested a prototype in rural Ghana, and the next step is to roll out units across the continent, starting with Nigeria and Sudan.

Local partners, international investors

In July, Attisani will present the final design of a scaled up 40-meter, 15-ton machine to potential customers and investors.
“We have support from big corporations but I cannot say their names yet,” says Attisani, citing interest from leading mobile phone and energy companies.
The project has also received 1.4 million euros from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research funding program.
“The project could have a huge social and economic impact especially in Africa,” an EU spokesperson said. “It aims to bring clean energy and clean water to people in countries that are in desperate need of both vital resources… and ultimately contribute to raising the living standards of potentially millions of people.”
Attisani stresses the need to involve local NGOs and civil society to drive widespread adoption.
“No technology can change the world without a human factor,” says the entrepreneur. “Local partners will care for the logistics, spread the word, play a role in education, and leverage functionality.”

Empowering economies

Beyond subsistence needs, the machines could power a surge of economic growth.
“We expect Watly to be a starting point for local entrepreneurs to start businesses,” says Attisani.
Within eight years, the company hopes to install 10,000 units across Africa, and estimates this will create 50,000 jobs. Many of these will relate to construction and maintenance of the machines and their products, while others will come indirectly through businesses benefitting from a reliable supply of vital services.
Attisani believes the model of providing services through localized, sustainable modules could have far-reaching consequences.
“There are going to be hundreds of companies developing technologies similar to Watly,” he says. “This could create a new economic paradigm worldwide.”
Read more at CNN Africa

Facebook unveils WhatsApp apps for Mac, Windows desktops (CNET)

Jettisoning need for a Web browser, new app promises a more streamlined process for chatting with friends and family.

https://www.whatsapp.com/download/

 

WhatsApp is one of the most popular chat apps for smartphones in use today. But to use it on a desktop, you had to run a Web app through your browser.

Now the Facebook-owned app is streamlining the process with the launch of a desktop app that syncs with your mobile device. WhatsApp said the new desktop app, which was released Tuesday, mirrors your mobile device, allowing you to message friends and family while your phone is in your pocket.

And because it runs natively on your desktop as opposed to through an app on your browser, the app allows for native notifications and better keyboard shortcuts, WhatsApp said.

After downloading the app for either desktops running Windows 8 and above or Mac OS 10.9 and above, open the app and scan the QR code with your phone to sync the devices.

Read More at CNET.com

SAP to train more than 150,000 youth in 30 African countries (IT News Africa)

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SAP has revealed that it will train more than 150,000 youth in 30 African countries this year to foster digital literacy and equip the continent’s rising generation with job-relevant digital skills. SAP’s Africa Code Week 2016 will run from October 15 – 23, 2016, with thousands of free coding workshops and online trainings offered to children and youth aged 8 to 24.

SAP to train more than 150,000 youth in 30 African countries

“Today literacy should go beyond just knowing how to read and write, even beyond digital literacy- knowing how to use computers. Basic literacy for the next generation should be about coding,’ commented Jean Philbert Nsengimana, The Minister of Youth and ICT of the government of Rwanda.

The Africa Code Week 2016 kickoff coincides with The World Economic Forum (WEF) on Africa in Kigali, Rwanda, on May 10 – 12*.

The World Economic Forum estimates that Africa’s growth will be just below 5% this year as the global economy continues to suffer. The continent has the fastest growing digital consumer market and the largest working-age population in the world. At the same time, African companies are scrambling to fill positions with employees who possess the right digital skills. Only one percent of African children leave school with basic coding skills.

Africa Code Week 2016 workshops for younger aged groups (8-11, 12-17) will be based on Scratch, a learning platform developed by the MIT Media Lab to simplify coding. Students will learn coding basics and program their own animations, quizzes, and games. Ages 18 and 24 will be taught Introduction to Web Technologies (HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP, SQL), a workshop that will give them a basic understanding of typical website architecture while teaching them how to create a fully operational, mobile-friendly website.

Africa Code Week 2016 will be organized by SAP and hundreds of partners spanning local African governments, NPOs, NGOs, educational institutions and businesses including the Cape Town Science Centre, the Galway Education Centre, Google, AMPION, the King Baudouin Foundation, and ATOS.

“Digital literacy is the currency of the digital economy. Africa Code Week is a powerful way to spread digital literacy across the continent and contribute towards building the skilled workforce needed for Africa’s sustainable growth. SAP is proud to spearhead such a meaningful initiative in partnership with more than 100 local and international organizations from the public and private sector,” commented Brett Parker, Managing Director SAP Africa.

The initiative will run in Algeria, Angola, Benin, Botswana, Cameroon, Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, The Gambia, Ivory Coast, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Critical to the success of the program is the training of thousands of teachers, parents and educators across the 30 African countries. Between the kick-off today and the start of Africa Code Week 2016 in October, SAP will conduct thousands of train-the-trainer sessions to help prepare them for the initiative. In addition, access to OpenSAP online courses enables further scale and impact.

2015 hugely surpassed expected participation Africa Code Week – the largest digital literacy initiative ever organized on the African continent – was launched by SAP and partners in 2015 with the goal of training 20,000 young people across 17 African countries. That goal was surpassed with an impressive 89,000 youth introduced to coding by 1,500 trained trainers across 17 countries in 10 days. Africa Code Week received a C4F award (category: ‘Education of the Future’) from the World Communications Forum in Davos on March 8, 2016.

Africa Code Week, addressing primary and secondary students, is part of SAP’s effort to bridge the digital skills gap and drive sustainable growth in Africa. The company invests in a full cycle of skills support for young people in Africa, including SAP Skills for Africa which gives recent university graduates the business and IT skills needed to be ready to enter the workforce.

Read more at: http://www.itnewsafrica.com/2016/05/sap-to-train-more-than-150000-youth-in-30-african-countries/

Using Skype Translator to communicate in real-time with individuals that speak a different Language (IT News Africa)

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Over the course of the last few years, various technology trends such as cloud computing, social networking, mobility, and analytics have disrupted established business models as well as industries and changed the way and speed at which people communicate and work together. Companies are working with partners and suppliers that are based overseas and competing for the wallet share of international customers.

By Staff Writer (IT News Africa)

Skype for Business unveiled. (Image Source: http://wearepcr.com/).

Because of this, modern organisations are often confronted by a range of challenges that may include cultural differences. If you are not able to speak the preferred language of the person you’re doing business with, the language gap can become a serious obstacle to attaining a more fruitful relationship.

Success in business often relies on the strength of the personal relationships you have with affiliates, partners, suppliers and customers within a given country. Simply being able to greet them in their own language can be one of the easier methods of allowing for a deeper level of engagement.

Breaking down language barriers through Skype Translator
By using this tool on any Skype-enabled device, users can make free Skype Translator video or voice calls with someone who speaks another language. Translator is currently available in six languages including English, German and French.

The words that you speak into your microphone are analysed and turned into text, in a similar way to how this achieved when you ask Cortana a question within Windows 10 or Windows Phone 8.1. Next, the text is put through the Microsoft Translator engine to change it to your Skype partner’s language.

This powerful communications tool can come in handy within a range of scenarios. For instance, thanks to support being available for Mandarin, Skype Translator can be used by employees of African countries, who do a lot of business with Chinese firms.

Roadwarriors and jetsetters can use the app to translate key phrases during their overseas trips.

PhD student can employ Skype Translator to augment his thesis research, with the assistance of experts who reside in neighbouring African countries that are Francophone (French speaking) like Côte d’Ivoire for instance.

Whatever the usage, Skype Translator will assist businesses and people communicate more effectively across language barriers.

Read more at IT News Africa: http://www.itnewsafrica.com/2016/04/using-skype-translator-to-ensure-that-nothing-gets-lost-in-translation/

 

Free, must-have Google Chrome extensions (ZDnet)

Free, must-have Google Chrome extensions
If you are a Google Chrome user and you’re not making use of extensions, then you are really missing out. Here are a selection of extensions aimed specifically at boosting your productivity and privacy.

Caption by: Adrian Kingsley-Hughes

Get more done with free privacy and productivity extensions for Google Chrome

Google Chrome is more than just a web browser. It’s a platform for getting things done on the internet, and by downloading and installing some choice extensions, you can customize your browser to work the way you want it to work.

Here are over two dozen extensions that focus on privacy and productivity. With these you can take screenshots, secure your browser, keep your passwords safe, take control of your tabs, secure your connection, do more with Gmail, grab text out of images, and much more.

All these extensions are free and are available to download from the Chrome Web Store.

Visit the link below for the complete list of must have extensions

http://www.zdnet.com/pictures/free-must-have-google-chrome-extensions/

 

How to use WhatsApp from your computer (CNET)

 Tired of only being able to access your WhatsApp conversations on your phone? Start using WhatsApp Web.Typing long messages or holding multiple WhatsApp conversations on your smartphone is possible, but there are times when typing away on a full keyboard and viewing messages on a full-size computer screen would be better.

by

For those times, you can use WhatsApp’s Web platform to send and receive messages with your WhatsApp contacts.

Requirements

According to WhatsApp’s support page, you can use WhatsApp on the Web if your phone is one of the following:

  • Android
  • iPhone 8.1+
  • Windows Phone 8.0 and 8.1
  • Nokia S60, Nokia S40 EVO
  • BlackBerry and BlackBerry 10

When you’re using WhatsApp Web, your phone will still need to have a data or Wi-Fi connection. That’s because the platform essentially mirrors the app on your smartphone. So if, for example, you’re traveling in another country and your phone doesn’t have a connection, you won’t be able to use WhatsApp Web.

How to set up WhatsApp Web

The bulk of the setup is pairing your phone with WhatsApp Web.

  1. Using Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Safari or Edge, head tohttps://web.whatsapp.com/.
  2. You’ll see a QR code for you to scan with the WhatsApp phone app. Just below the code, you’ll see instructions for where that scanning option lies within the app. For example, in the iOS app, tap on settings, then WhatsApp Web.
  3. After scanning the code, your WhatsApp messages will display on your phone and in the browser. A Wi-Fi connection isn’t required for your phone, but WhatsApp recommends one to cut back on the amount of cellular data used by your phone.

The layout of WhatsApp Web mirrors the mobile experience, just on a larger scale. You can still send emoji, photos and voice notes, view your contact list, and receive notifications on the computer.

A note on security

Going forward, anyone who has access to your computer will be able to pull up your WhatsApp conversations as long as you remain logged in. If your computer is password-protected, that’s probably not a big deal. But when using WhatsApp Web from a public computer, sign out when you’re finished. You can do that by clicking on the three-dot menu icon and selecting Log out.

If you forget to log out of WhatsApp Web on a computer that’s not yours, or you suspect someone has gained access to your account, you can log out of all active sessions by visiting the same settings page you used to scan the QR Code. (For iOS, again, that would be Settings > WhatsApp Web.)

Editor’s note:This post was originally published in January of 2015 and has since been updated with new information.
Read more at CNET.com

 http://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-use-whatsapp-from-your-computer/

14 Middle East & Africa non-profits to receive Microsoft grants (IT News Africa)

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Microsoft Philanthropies has announced grants for over 100 non-profits worldwide, of which 14 are in the Middle East and Africa. These grants are a component of the $75M commitment Microsoft made to increase access to computer science education around the world through Microsoft YouthSpark, as announced by Satya Nadella last year.

By Staff writer (IT News Africa)

14 non-profits across Middle East & Africa to receive Microsoft grants. (Image Source: Microsoft)

Microsoft is partnering with these nonprofits by providing cash grants, content and other resources needed to bring computational thinking and problem-solving skills to young people in local communities, important building blocks to help them succeed in today’s tech-fueled economy.

“Computational thinking and problem-solving skills will be relevant to every job in the future,” says Satya Nadella, CEO, Microsoft. “Through our partnerships with nonprofit organizations around the world, we aim to empower all youth to prepare for this future with the foundational knowledge of computer science to dream and create the innovations of tomorrow.”

One of these partnerships is with Silatech, a dynamic social initiative that works to create jobs and expand economic opportunities for young people throughout the Arab world. Microsoft recently partnered with Silatech to provide online employability resources to Arab youth through the Ta3mal employability platform.  Microsoft is also eager to continue the partnership with World Vision, the new implementing partner of the recently transitioned TizaaWorks employability platform in Ghana.

Closing the computer science skills gap and reaching young people on a global scale is a multi-faceted challenge that cannot be solved by one organization or solution alone.

Microsoft’s partnerships with nonprofit organizations mean that more young people in the MEA region—particularly underserved communities, girls and ethnic and racially diverse populations-will have access to computer science education, helping build skills critical for future success.

One such partnership that will aid in bridging the gap in computer science skills is the Oman Information Technology Society and We Speak Code Initiative which promotes learning how to code through various activities and projects.

Other countries in the region to receive grants include Morocco, Cote D’Ivoire, Nigeria, Turkey, Kenya, Tunisia, South Africa, Oman, Egypt, Pakistan, Ghana and Cameroon.

read more at: http://www.itnewsafrica.com/2016/04/14-middle-east-african-non-profits-to-receive-microsoft-grants/