Agency Profile: We are proud to welcome the USPS as a merchant to the African Union Expo 2016

We welcome the USPS to the Expo. the USPS will be providing innovative and cost effective small business solutions for attendees at the event.

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

About the United States Postal Service

A self-supporting, independent federal agency, the U.S. Postal Service is the only delivery service that reaches every address in the nation: 155 million residences, businesses and Post Office Boxes. The Postal Service receives no tax dollars for operating expenses and relies on the sale of postage, products and services to fund its operations.12888515_10154069312144810_559064071407089210_o

With more than 31,600 retail locations and the most frequently visited website in the federal government, usps.com, the Postal Service has annual revenue of nearly $69 billion and delivers 47 percent of the world’s mail. With more than half a million employees, the Postal Service is one of the nation’s largest employers. If it were a private sector company, the U.S. Postal Service would rank 43rd in the 2015 Fortune 500 and 137th in the 2015 Global Fortune 500 list. The Postal Service has one of the world’s largest computer networks — linking nearly 32,000 facilities and making communication possible between hundreds of thousands of employees, as well as our customers.

The Postal Service mission is to provide a reliable, efficient, trusted and affordable universal delivery service that connects people and helps businesses grow. Everyone living in the United States and its territories has access to postal products and services and pays the same for a First-Class postage stamp regardless of their location.

The Postal Service has established a core set of enduring goals that guide all of its strategic initiatives and continuous improvement efforts:

  • Deliver High-Quality Services
  • Provide Excellent Customer Experiences
  • Ensure a Safe Workplace and an Engaged Workforce

The Postal Service puts information and technology at the center of its business strategies. It’s finding ways to harness analytics and insights and information to empower employees and customers. It’s also speeding the pace of innovation, and developing mobile and digital tools to play a larger role in the daily digital lives of customers. The Postal Service is already a technology-centric organization. It uses the world’s most advanced tracking and information systems to speed the flow of mail and packages throughout its network, creating literally billions of data points every day. The Postal Service is leveraging the information derived from that robust scanning and tracking to add value to the senders and receivers of mail and packages — and to create new products and services to spur growth in the mailing industry.12615144_10153937912994810_828888854269488854_o

The U.S. Postal Service continues to play an indispensable role as a driver of commerce and as a provider of delivery services that connects Americans to one another — reliably, affordably and securely, and to every residential and business address.

If you’re looking for the official source of information about USPS, please visit our homepage atUSPS.com®.
You can also find us on:
http://www.uspseverywhere.com/
http://www.twitter.com/USPS
https://www.instagram.com/uspostalservice/
http://www.linkedin.com/company/usps
http://www.youtube.com/usps
http://www.facebook.com/USPSstamps

Richard.Danzo@usps.gov

Merchant Profile: We are proud to welcome ChokoMODE as a merchant to the African Union Expo 2016

ChokoMODE will be Featuring their clothing collections  during the Expo.

www.chokomode.com

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

ChokoMODE is a unique clothing line offering individual collections of rich quality fabric for today’s professional woman whether at work or at play. Our designs are classy, sophisticated, and elegant yet boast a figure-flattering tailored fit. chokomode1

We are passionate about creating indelible first impressions for the style-functional woman. Our clothing is designed for authority and power while embracing the soft and sexy femininity within every woman.

chokoMODE celebrates the cultural essence of each piece of fabric that is globally imported and recognized in our designs.

We strive to give our customers the exclusive experience of feeling beautiful by wearing the finest garments that flow with dignity and grace for every mood.  Our brand symbolizes the essence of the well-dressed woman while offering a high-quality collection of fashion items built for the success and lifestyle of the modern working woman.  Our clothing
represents an expression of who we are as women and the perception based on what we wear.

Our fashionable collection is comprised of versatile business attire and after work evening wear ranging from business and leisure suits, alternating jackets, pants, and skirts, as well as colorful and comfortable cocktail dresses.  Our custom designs are made to compliment the career-to-casual minded wardrobe and embody confidence with detailed
feminine appeal worthy to compliment any woman of any size. chokomode2

Welcome to chokoMODE!

About the designer

Marcelle Gakam proudly hails from Cameroon, Central Africa before transplanting to the United States.   Driven by her passion for fashion, she sets up chokoMODE headquarters in Houston, Texas.  Now residing in New
York, the fashion capital of the world, and taking courses at FIT, Marcelle is determined to make her original chokoMODE brand of style and apparel a worldwide standard of the fashion industry.

According to Marcelle, the name “Chokomode” was inspired by her grandmother’s name Choko,  but decided to add “MODE” to emphasize the unique spirit, culture and heritage of strong professional women across
the globe.  Thus the tagline, “dressing the professional woman with elegance” was born.

Influenced by her French-African roots, she was compelled to build a brand from the ground up that spoke to sophisticated women from various backgrounds, ethnicities and walks of life. chokomode

Contact

info@chokoMODE.com

Tel: 855-552-4656

social media (Facebook & Instagram): @chokomode

Marcelle Gakam
www.chokomode.com
220 WADSWORTH AVE #203, NEW YORK, NY, 10033
Social media: @chokomode
Thanks
Marcelle
Ceo/Designer @chokomode

Health Services Profile: We are pleased African Services Committee (ASC) to the African Union Expo 2016

We are pleased to announce the support of the African Services Committee  (ASC) for the African Union Expo 2016.

ASC30thAnnLogoBIG

ASC, we be providing Health, awareness and testing services during the expo.

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

African Services Committee is a non-profit organization dedicated to improving the health and self-sufficiency of the African community. We provide health, housing, legal, educational, and social services to over 10,000 newcomers each year in New York City with a focus on HIV prevention, care and support. We also work on the frontlines of the global AIDS epidemic; operating five clinics in Ethiopia and through advocacy and policy work in the U.S. and abroad.

Learn more at www.africanservices.org

We are pleased to announce the support of the U.S. Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) for the African Union Expo 2016

SBA 1 asbdcsba 2 cuny_logotype_blue

We are pleased to announce the support of the U.S. Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) for the African Union Expo 2016. the SBA SDBCs they are as follows:

  • Columbia University Business School, Harlem 
  • CUNY, York College 
  • CUNY, City Tech
  • CUNY, Lehman College

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

U.S. Small Business Administration, Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs) will be delivering the sessions related to export finance, and export  strategy, Business planning, Marketing and e-commerce.

About the SDBCs

The Columbia-Harlem Small Business Development Center (CHSBDC) has been part of the community of Upper Manhattan since 2009. Funded partially by the United States Small Business Administration, the CHSBDC is one of 900 centers across the country that offer free business advice and training provided by qualified small business professionals to existing and future entrepreneurs.

Unlike other small business assistance programs, we offer intensive one-on-one counseling to our clients, allowing us to truly build a strong relationship with them. We have thus cultivated a network of experts, mentors and program alumni in all industries, some of which are willing to assist new clients in need. Our connection to Columbia Business School also gives our clients access to world-renowned faculty members, business students, and alumni business leaders.

Located in Columbia Business School, the center is committed to supporting the economic sustainability of New Yorkers—one business at a time.

http://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/sbdc/about

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Brooklyn Small Business Development Center

We think New York is great for small business — and so do our clients.

Since our start in 1986, the expert advisors of the Brooklyn SBDC have worked directly with 14,114 businesses, helping them to invest $83,219,174 in the area’s economy, and create or save 3,862 jobs.

If you or your business reside in New York, the SBDC can maneuver you around the obstacles to success.  Among other things, we help our clients:

  • understand the importance of a business plan
  • discover sources of funding
  • prepare for e-commerce
  • identify avenues for exporting goods & services
  • develop marketing plans
  • assess an invention’s viability
  • comply with licensing & regulations

And thanks to our partners in the public and private sectors, our services are free of charge.

http://www.nyssbdc.org/centers/centers.aspx?centid=28

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Small Business Development Center, York College 

Since our start in 1988, The New York Small Business Development Center at York College has achieved over $125 Million in economic impact through loans they helped their clients obtain. The expert advisers have worked with 14,468 businesses, and have created or saved 3,979 jobs.

https://www.york.cuny.edu/conted/sbdc

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We welcome the support of the Empire State Development Corporation for the 2nd annual African Union Expo 2016

We welcome the support of the New York State Empire State Development  Corporation again to the Expo this year.

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

Mr. Ibrahima S. Souare will be delivering the session titled: “Doing Business with New York State.isouare

Ibrahima S. Souare is a native of the Francophone Republic of Guinea-Conakry. He immigrated to the United States at the age of seven with his family. Mr. Souare has spent majority of his upbringing in New York City, and speaks three languages in addition to English, which are, French, Manike, and Susu. Mr. Souare is a graduate of the City University of New York Lehman College, and holds a bachelor’s degree in Political Science.

Economic development has become a passion for Mr. Souare–and he has and continues to develop his expertise in the areas of enterprise launch planning, market expansion, and capacity building. Mr. Souare is also an instructor with New York City Department of Small Business Services where he holds seminar classes on business planning and business marketing strategies.

Currently, he is a Senior Business Development Associate with the New York State agency, Empire State Development under its Division of Minority and Women Business Development.     

Mr. Souare, outside of work, is the Director of Student Outreach for The Council of Young African Leaders. He is also a member of Sigma Phi Rho Fraternity Inc. where holds the position of National Public Relations Officer.

We are honored to announce the support of NYS Assembly Speaker Carl E. Heastie for the 2nd annual African Union Expo 2016

We are honored to announce the support of NYS assembly speaker Carl E. Heastie for the 2nd annual African Union Expo 2016.

Visit AfricanUnionExpo.org for more information for Merchants and general Attendees or email  info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002

nys-speaker-heastie

NEW YORK STATE ASSEMBLY

 

November 15, 2016

Dear Friends:

Please accept my sincere greetings as you gather to celebrate the African Union Expo LLC, Go Africa Capital LLC, and The Go Africa Network Inc.’s 2nd annual African Union Expo 2016.

The proud beginning of this event was to strengthen the economic, social and governmental cooperation between Africa and America. This year’s Expo will focus on understanding the importance of a business plan and discovering sources of funding. This unique opportunity for entrepreneurs, startups and companies to engage, interact and learn formative knowledge will help advance the awareness and socio-economic development of Africa through local and international outreach initiatives for the evolving future.

This innovative Expo will highlight and reinforce the economic, political and social ties between the African Union Member countries and the United States of America – bringing together businessmen and political leaders to exchange views and news on promoting trade and investment opportunities. This is an opportunity for government and companies to engage and interact to better understand our evolving futures.

Again, congratulations on your 2nd annual African Union Expo, and best wishes to The Go Africa Capital LLC and The Go Africa Network, Inc. for continued success.

Sincerely,

CARL E. HEASTIE

Speaker

african-union-expo-nys-speak-heastie-10-17-2016

The types of Coffee Beans used in Go Africa®Coffee (Q&A)

You can buy Go Africa Coffee at:  www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore

 

The types of Coffee Beans used in Go Africa®Coffee

We have received so many inquiries regarding which beans are used in Go Africa Coffee. Since we source are beans from the following countries: (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d’Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo) the short answer is it depends.

images-4We have asked our resident Coffeelogist and Chief Roaster, Losseni Kone, to help provide an answer.

Coffee aficionados of all levels have without a doubt heard the words “Robusta” or “Arabica” However, Coffee is much more complex than just type of Coffee.

Below is a list of Countries and Types of beans sourced from the country for Go Africa Coffee. Keep in mind a Country can source more than one type of bean:

  • images-2Ethiopia: (Arabica, Sadamo (Yirgachefe and Guji))
  • Kenya: (Bourbon, French Mission)
  • Côte d’Ivoire (Arabica, Gros Idente, Excelsea, Kouilou and Petit Indenize)
  • Tanzania: (Robusta)
  • Cameroon: (Arabica)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo: (Robusta)

 

 

Below is a detail description of each type and subclass of Coffee Beans grown in the various regions of Africa.

 coffee-615

Not all of Africa’s coffee production is limited to Robusta, however. Here’s an overview of the different coffee varieties that are grown frequently across the African continent (keep in mind that while some of these coffees are considered single origin in nature, most like Arabica and Robusta are not):

  • Sadamo:A type of Arabica (which you can find elsewhere in this list) grown as a single origin coffee source in Sadamo, Ethiopia, this variety of coffee is a small bean that produces a rich, spicy and almost chocolatey flavor. Individual types of Ethiopian Sadamo include Yirgachefe and Guji, both known to be of high quality. Another type of Ethiopian coffee is Harar, which is another Arabica but not grown in Sadamo. More on these types of coffees later.
  • Liberica:Coffea Liberica is a species separate from Arabica as well. It typically grows in the western areas of Africa – most notably Liberia. Liberica’s taste is closer to Robusta than that of Arabica, and the beans grow on trees that can grow as high as 10 to 15 meters tall.
    Gros Idente: Similar to Liberica, Gros Idente coffee is grown in large trees in the western areas of Africa, such as the Ivory Coast.
  • Arabica:Yes, for all of our talk about Robusta growing in Africa, it can be easy to forget that Arabica coffee is also grown in Africa. Typically, the environments suited for growing Arabica in Africa are in mountainous areas – places like the mainland of the Ivory Coast and Cameroon are typical spots where Arabica coffee is grown. only-on-amazon-gacoffee
  • Excelsea:Like Liberica coffee, these trees grow high. In fact, they are also grown in the Ivory Coast which contributes to much of their similarities to Liberica and Gros Idente coffees.
  • Robusta:Much of the African environment is suitable for Robusta growing, typically the lower-lying areas in the equatorial regions of Africa. Robusta is grown just about everywhere from Madagascar to Gabon – even if Vietnam is a leading producer of Robusta coffee, its African roots are hard to shake off.
  • Kouilou and Petit Indenize:Grown inland along the Ivory Coast, these are actually smaller coffee trees.
  • Bourbon:This type of coffee was already mentioned before, but its influence in African coffee is difficult to understate. Bourbon was planted in Reunion – an island off the eastern coast of Madagascar – in the 18th century. The type of coffee then mutated, producing Bourbon coffee, which was then moved around the world and cultivated in different areas.
  • French Mission:This refers to a type of Bourbon coffee that was planted by French missionaries in areas of East Africa around the turn of the 20th century. A Kenyan type of this coffee known as K7 is also grown in Africa.
  • Mayaguez:Another subset of Bourbon coffee, this coffee is grown in Rwanda. Typically, the Bourbon coffees planted in Africa are spread throughout the eastern portions of the continent and Madagascar.

Considering the degree of geographical, environmental, and climate differences on a large continent like Africa, it’s not surprising that so many different varieties of coffee are produced there to some degree – including the world-popular Arabica.images-4

Coffee aficionados of all levels have without a doubt heard the words “Robusta” or “Arabica”. If you aren’t familiar with either, these two terms describe the two different species of beans grown commercially. They are the same in that when harvested, roasted and eventually brewed to become that magical thing we call coffee. However, that’s where the similarities end. Robusta and Arabica differ when it comes to taste, growing environments and quality:

Taste

Robusta has a neutral to harsh taste range and is often likened to having an “oatmeal-like” taste. When unroasted, the smell of Robusta beans is described as raw-peanutty.

Arabicas, on the other hand, have a very wide taste range (depending on its varietal). The range differs from sweet-soft to sharp-tangy. When unroasted, Arabica beans smell like blueberries. Their roasted smell is described as perfumey with notes of fruit and sugar tones.

Growing environments

Robusta coffee beans come from a resilient plant that is able to be grown in low altitudes of 200-800 meters. Robusta beans aren’t very susceptible to damage done by pests. Additionally, they produce more finished product per acre and require fairly low production costs.images-3

Contrariwise, Arabica coffee beans are fragile and must grow in cool, subtropical climates.  Arabica beans also need a lot of moisture, rich soil, shade and sun. Because of their fragility, Arabica beans are vulnerable to attack from various pests and can be damaged by cold temperatures or poor handling. This type of bean also needs to be grown at a higher elevation (600-2000 meters).

Which bean is better? 

No contest!  If you had to choose between an Arabica bean and a Robusta bean, it’s important to always choose Arabica.images-1

Robusta fosters use mono-cropping, the practice of growing the same plant every year in one place. It yields more space since it involves clear-cutting the forest for the crop. Because Robusta is more a resilient plant than the delicate Arabica, it can be grown in more places. Large coffee companies buy huge amounts of rainforest, clear-cut the land and plant Robusta beans. Robusta is often mixed with Arabica,  allowing the coffee companies to save a pretty penny and serve you a crappy cup. Not to mention, mono-cropping, when done excessively, also erodes soil and demolishes nutrients making the soil nearly unusable.

We are proud to announce the support of The National Urban League for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.

We are proud to announce the support of The National Urban League  for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.  Register to win up to 1,000.00! at

at http://africanunionexpo.org/events/african-union-expo-2016-nyc-harlem-on-11152016-from-10am-7pm/

or email info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002 to the attend or to request further  information

follow: #AfricanUnionExpo2016

This year will feature 2 new events:

  • Go Africa Startup Contest (for entrepreneurs, startups and small companies)
    • General category
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 1,000 cash (First Prize)
      • 250 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 150 Gift Card (Third Prize)
    • Innovation & idea Category
    • Contestant has an innovation or idea that is in the incubation, development stage
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 150 Gift Card (First Prize)
      • 100 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 75 Gift Card (Third Prize)

Contestant, Individual or Business can only compete and/or win in one of the categories but not both.

  • Business Review (business plan review and financing, planning assessment) Featuring the following:
    • Individual planning and assessment with Go Africa Capital LLC and a financial institution for your business or startup.
    • Individualized scoring and funding proposal created for your business
  • If the funding proposal is accepted by all parties involved, funding will be provided within 60 – 120 days.
  • See (business Review Section for more details on the criteria, and other parameters

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About the National Urban League: nul-images-4

Our Mission
The mission of the Urban League movement is to enable African Americans to secure economic self-reliance, parity, power and civil rights.

Our History
The National Urban League, which has played so pivotal a role in the 20th-Century Freedom Movement, grew out of that spontaneous grassroots movement for freedom and opportunity that came to be called the Black Migrations. When the U.S. Supreme Court declared its approval of segregation in the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision, the brutal system of economic, social and political oppression the White South quickly adopted rapidly transformed what had been a trickle of African Americans northward into a flood. nulu-logo nul_footer_logo

Those newcomers to the North soon discovered they had not escaped racial discrimination. Excluded from all but menial jobs in the larger society, victimized by poor housing and education, and inexperienced in the ways of urban living, many lived in terrible social and economic conditions.

Still, in the degree of difference between South and North lay opportunity, and that African Americans clearly understood. But to capitalize on that opportunity, to successfully adapt to urban life and to reduce the pervasive discrimination they faced, they would need help. That was the reason the Committee on Urban Conditions Among Negroes was established on September 29, 1910 in New York City. Central to the organization’s founding were two remarkable people: Mrs. Ruth Standish Baldwin and Dr. George Edmund Haynes, who would become the Committee’s first executive secretary.

Mrs. Baldwin, the widow of a railroad magnate and a member of one of America’s oldest families, had a remarkable social conscience and was a stalwart champion of the poor and disadvantaged. Dr. Haynes, a graduate of Fisk University, Yale University, and Columbia University (he was the first African American to receive a doctorate from that institution), felt a compelling need to use his training as a social worker to serve his people.
A year later, the Committee merged with the Committee for the Improvement of Industrial Conditions Among Negroes in New York (founded in New York in 1906), and the National League for the Protection of Colored Women (founded in 1905) to form the National League on Urban Conditions Among Negroes. In 1920, the name was later shortened to the National Urban League.

The interracial character of the League’s board was set from its first days. Professor Edwin R. A. Seligman of Columbia University, one of the leaders in progressive social service activities in New York City, served as chairman from 1911 to 1913. Mrs. Baldwin took the post until 1915.

The fledgling organization counseled black migrants from the South, helped train black social workers, and worked in various other ways to bring educational and employment opportunities to blacks. Its research into the problems blacks faced in employment opportunities, recreation, housing, health and sanitation, and education spurred the League’s quick growth. By the end of World War I the organization had 81 staff members working in 30 cities.

In 1918, Dr. Haynes was succeeded by Eugene Kinckle Jones who would direct the agency until his retirement in 1941. Under his direction, the League significantly expanded its multifaceted campaign to crack the barriers to black employment, spurred first by the boom years of the 1920s, and then, by the desperate years of the Great Depression. Efforts at reasoned persuasion were buttressed by boycotts against firms that refused to employ blacks, pressures on schools to expand vocational opportunities for young people, constant prodding of Washington officials to include blacks in New Deal recovery programs and a drive to get blacks into previously segregated labor unions.

As World War II loomed, Lester Granger, a seasoned League veteran and crusading newspaper columnist, was appointed Eugene Kinckle Jones successor.

Outspoken in his commitment to advancing opportunity for blacks, Granger pushed tirelessly to integrate the racist trade unions and led the League’s effort to support A. Philip Randolph’s March on Washington Movement to fight discrimination in defense work and in the armed services. Under Granger, the League, through its own Industrial Relations Laboratory, had notable success in cracking the color bar in numerous defense plants. The nation’s demand for civilian labor during the war also helped the organization press ahead with greater urgency its programs to train black youths for meaningful blue-collar employment. After the war those efforts expanded to persuading Fortune 500 companies to hold career conferences on the campuses of Negro colleges and place blacks in upper-echelon jobs.

Of equal importance to the League’s own future sources of support, Granger avidly supported the organization of its volunteer auxiliary, the National Urban League Guild, which, under the leadership of Mollie Moon, became an important national force in its own right.

The explosion of the civil rights movement provoked a change for the League, one personified by its new leader, Whitney M. Young, Jr., who became executive director in 1961. A social worker like his predecessors, he substantially expanded the League’s fund-raising ability and, most critically, made the League a full partner in the civil rights movement. Although the League’s tax-exempt status barred it from protest activities, it hosted at its New York headquarters the planning meetings of A. Philip Randolph, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other civil rights leaders for the 1963 March on Washington. Young was also a forceful advocate for greater government and private-sector efforts to eradicate poverty. His call for a domestic Marshall Plan, a ten-point program designed to close  the huge social and economic gap between black and white Americans, significantly influenced the discussion of the Johnson Administration’s War on Poverty legislation.

Young’s tragic death in 1971 in a drowning incident off the coast of Lagos, Nigeria brought another change in leadership. Vernon E. Jordan, Jr., formerly Executive Director of the United Negro College Fund, took over as the League’s fifth Executive Director in 1972 (the title of the office was changed to President in 1977). For the next decade, until his resignation in December 1981, Jordan skillfully guided the League to new heights of achievement. He oversaw a major expansion of its social service efforts, as the League became a significant conduit for the federal government to establish programs and deliver services to aid urban communities, and brokered fresh initiatives in such League programs as housing, health, education and minority business development. Jordan also instituted a citizenship education program that helped increase the black vote and brought new programs to such areas as energy, the environment, and non-traditional jobs for women of color-and he developed The State of Black America report.

In 1982, John E. Jacob, a former chief executive officer of the Washington, D.C. and San Diego affiliates who had served as Executive Vice President, took the reins of leadership, solidifying the League’s internal structure and expanding its outreach even further.

Jacob established the Permanent Development Fund in order to increase the organization’s financial stamina. In honor of Whitney Young, he established several programs to aid the development of those who work for and with the League: The Whitney M. Young, Jr. Training Center, to provide training and leadership development opportunities for both staff and volunteers; the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Race Relations Program, which recognizes affiliates doing exemplary work in race relations; and the Whitney M. Young, Jr. Commemoration Ceremony, which honors and pays tribute to long term staff and volunteers who have made extraordinary contributions to the Urban League Movement.

Jacob established the League’s NULITES youth development program and spurred the League to put new emphasis on programs to reduce teenage pregnancy, help single female heads of households, combat crime in black communities, and increase voter registration.

Hugh B. Price, appointed to the League’s top office in July 1994, took over the reins at a critical moment for the League, for black America, and for the nation as a whole. In the early 90’s, the fierce market-driven dynamic of “globalization,” was sweeping the world, fundamentally altering the economic relations among and within countries and reshaping the link between the nation’s citizenry and its economy, fostering enormous uncertainty among individuals and tensions among ethnic and cultural groups.

This economic change and the efforts of some to rollback the gains African Americans fashioned since the 1960s made the League’s efforts all the more necessary. Price, a lawyer with extensive experience in community development and public policy issues, intensified the organization’s work in three broad areas: in education and youth development, individual and community-wide economic empowerment, affirmative action and the promotion of inclusion as a critical foundation for securing America’s future as a multi-ethnic democracy.

Among Price’s most notable achievements was establishing the League’s Institute of Opportunity and Equality in Washington, DC, which conducted research and public policy analysis of urban issues and the Campaign for African American Achievement, a community mobilization and advocacy initiative created to raise awareness and promote the importance of achievement through the formation of the National Achievers Society, “Doing the Right Thing” recognition in local communities and the National Urban League’s Scholarship Program.

On May 15, 2003 the Board of Trustees of the National Urban League voted overwhelmingly to appoint former New Orleans Mayor Marc H. Morial as the League’s eighth President and Chief Executive Officer. As New Orleans Chief Executive, he was one of the most popular and effective mayors in the city’s history, leaving office with 70% approval rating. After being elected as one of the youngest mayors in the city’s history, crime plummeted by 60% a corrupt Police Department was reformed, new programs for youth were started and stagnant economy was reignited.

Since his appointment to the National Urban League, Morial has worked to reenergize the movement’s diverse constituencies by building on the strengths of the NUL’s 95 year old legacy and increasing the organization’s profile both locally and nationally.

In his first year, Morial worked to streamline the organization’s headquarters, secured over $10 million dollars in new funding to support affiliate programs, created the first Legislative Policy Conference “NUL on the Hill’, revamped the State of Black America report, created profitability for the annual conference, and secured a $127.5 million equity fund for  minority businesses through the new markets tax credit program. He introduced and developed a stronger strategic direction of the organization with a “five point empowerment agenda’ that focuses on closing the equality gaps which exist for African Americans and other emerging ethnic communities in education, economic empowerment, health and quality of life, civic engagement, and civil rights and racial justice.

We are proud to announce the support of Senator Adriano Espaillat for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.

We are proud to announce the support of Senator Adriano Espaillat for the 2nd African Union Business Expo to be held on 11/15/2016 at MIST Harlem from 10am -7pm.  Register to win up to 1,000.00! at

at http://africanunionexpo.org/events/african-union-expo-2016-nyc-harlem-on-11152016-from-10am-7pm/

or email info@africanunionexpo.com or phone 646-502-9778 Ext. 8002 to the attend or to request further  information

follow: #AfricanUnionExpo2016

This year will feature 2 new events:

  • Go Africa Startup Contest (for entrepreneurs, startups and small companies)
    • General category
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 1,000 cash (First Prize)
      • 250 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 150 Gift Card (Third Prize)
    • Innovation & idea Category
    • Contestant has an innovation or idea that is in the incubation, development stage
      • 10 min presentation of your business with 5 min Q&A from the Audience and Judges:
      • 150 Gift Card (First Prize)
      • 100 Gift Card (Second Prize)
      • 75 Gift Card (Third Prize)

Contestant, Individual or Business can only compete and/or win in one of the categories but not both.

  • Business Review (business plan review and financing, planning assessment) Featuring the following:
    • Individual planning and assessment with Go Africa Capital LLC and a financial institution for your business or startup.
    • Individualized scoring and funding proposal created for your business
  • If the funding proposal is accepted by all parties involved, funding will be provided within 60 – 120 days.
  • See (business Review Section for more details on the criteria, and other parameters.

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New York State Senator Adriano Espaillat is the Democratic candidate for New York’s 13th Congressional District in the 2016 general election. He is currently the Ranking Member of the Senate Housing, Construction, and Community Development Committee, and Chair of the Senate Puerto Rican/Latino Caucus; he is also a member of the Environmental Conservation, Economic Development, Codes, Insurance, and Judiciary committees. Prior to becoming a state senator, he served in the New York State Assembly, and was the first Dominican-American elected to a state legislature when he first won his seat in 1996. In 2002, Espaillat was elected chair of the New York State Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus, and helped to reunite the group after years of division. adriano-espaillat-headshot1-214x300

Throughout his tenure as a public servant, Espaillat has been a vocal advocate for protecting tenants, improving schools, and making serious, smart investments in economic development, job creation, and environmental protection. As state senator, he currently represents the neighborhoods of Marble Hill, Inwood, Washington Heights, Hamilton Heights, West Harlem, the Upper West Side, Hell’s Kitchen, Clinton, and Chelsea.

Senator Espaillat has sponsored and helped to pass landmark laws encouraging the construction and preservation of affordable housing, developing free legal services for tenants, giving 35,000 low-income day care workers access to healthcare and the ability to join the UFT, providing workers’ compensation for 40,000 livery cab drivers, and improving hospital translation services. Espaillat has also worked to protect landmarks, taking legal action to protect the Palisades when the LG Tower threatened to permanently mar its natural beauty. After the July 1999 blackout in Upper Manhattan caused financial damage to restaurants, bodegas, and other small businesses, Espaillat helped to secure an agreement from Con Edison to invest an additional $100 million in Upper Manhattan’s electrical infrastructure at no cost to ratepayers—and when customers were billed for expenses related to an Indian Point Energy Center shutdown, Espaillat fought back and got their money refunded.

As congressman, Senator Espaillat will bring new energy to Washington and will be a steadfast champion for working- and middle-class New Yorkers. He will fight for a fair living wage, immediate and effective investments in affordable housing, meaningful criminal justice reform, infrastructure improvements, expanded youth programs, and better educational opportunities. Prior to entering public service, Adriano served as the Manhattan Court Services Coordinator for the NYC Criminal Justice Agency, a non-profit organization that provides indigent legal services and works to reduce unnecessary pretrial detention and post-sentence incarceration costs. He later worked as Director of the Washington Heights Victims Services Community Office, an organization offering counseling and other services to families of victims of homicides and other crimes, and as the Director of Project Right Start, a national initiative funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to combat substance abuse by educating the parents of pre-school children.

Humans Spread From Africa in One Wave, DNA Shows (NYT)

By Carl Zimmer (NYT)

Did humans flood out of Africa in a single diaspora, or did we trickle from the continent in waves spread out over tens of thousands of years? The question, one of the biggest in human evolution, has plagued scientists for decades.

 

Now they may have found an answer.

In a series of unprecedented genetic analyses published on Wednesday in the journal Nature, three separate teams of researchers conclude that all non­Africans today trace their ancestry to a single population emerging from Africa between 50,000 and 80,000 years ago.

 

“I think all three studies are basically saying the same thing,” said Joshua M. Akey of the University of Washington, who wrote a commentary accompanying the new work. “We know there were multiple dispersals out of Africa, but we can trace our ancestry back to a single one.”

 

The three teams sequenced the genomes of 787 people, obtaining highly detailed scans of each. The genomes were drawn from people in hundreds of indigenous populations around the world — Basques, African pygmies, Mayans, Bedouins, Sherpas and Cree Indians, to name just a few.

 

The DNA of older indigenous populations may be essential to understanding human history, many geneticists believe. Yet until now scientists have sequenced few whole genomes from people outside population centers like Europe and China. The new findings already are altering scientific understanding of what human DNA looks like, experts said, adding a rich diversity of variation to our map of the genome.

 

Each team of researchers used sets of genomes to tackle different questions about our origins, such as how people spread across Africa and how others populated Australia. But all aimed to settle the question of human expansion from Africa.

 

In the 1980s, a group of paleoanthropologists and geneticists began championing a hypothesis that modern humans emerged only once from Africa, roughly 50,000 years ago. Skeletons and tools discovered at archaeological sites clearly indicated the existence of modern humans in Europe, Asia and Australia.

 

Early studies of bits of DNA also supported this scenario. All non­Africans are closely related to one another, the studies found, and they all branch from a genetic tree rooted in Africa.

Yet there are also clues that at least some modern humans lived outside of Africa well before 50,000 years ago, perhaps part of an earlier wave of migration.

In Israel, for example, researchers found a few distinctively modern human skeletons that are between 120,000 and 90,000 years old. In Saudi Arabia and India, they discovered sophisticated tools dating back as far as 100,000 years.

Last October, Chinese scientists reported finding teeth belonging to Homo sapiens that are at least 80,000 years old and perhaps as old as 120,000 years.

 

Some scientists have argued from these finds that there was a human expansion from Africa earlier than 50,000 years ago. In 2011 Eske Willerslev, a renowned geneticist at the University of Copenhagen, and his colleagues reported evidence that some living people descended from this early wave.

Dr. Willerslev and his colleagues reconstructed the genome of an Aboriginal Australian from a century­old lock of hair kept in a museum — the first reconstruction of its kind. The DNA held a number of peculiar variants not found in Europeans or Asians.

He concluded that the ancestors of Aboriginals split off from other non­Africans and moved eastward, eventually arriving in East Asia 62,000 to 75,000 years ago. Tens of thousands of years later, a separate population of Africans spread into Europe and Asia.

It was a big conclusion to draw from a single fragile genome, so Dr. Willerslev decided to contact living Aboriginals to see if they’d participate in a new genetic study. He joined David W. Lambert, a geneticist at Griffith University in Australia, who was already meeting with Aboriginal communities about beginning such a study.

Their new paper also includes DNA from people in Papua New Guinea, thanks to a collaboration with scientists at the University of Oxford. All told, the scientists were able to sequence 83 genomes from Aboriginal Australians and 25 from people in Papua New Guinea, all with far greater accuracy than in Dr. Willerslev’s 2011 study.

Meanwhile, Mait Metspalu of the Estonian Biocentre was leading a team of 98 scientists on another genome­gathering project.

They picked out 148 populations to sample, mostly in Europe and Asia, with a few genomes from Africa and Australia. They, too, sequenced 483 genomes at high resolution.

David Reich, a geneticist at Harvard Medical School, and his colleagues assembled a third database of genomes from all five continents. The Simons Genome Diversity Project, sponsored by the Simons Foundation and the National Science Foundation, contains 300 high­quality genomes from 142 populations.

Dr. Reich and his colleagues probed their data for the oldest evidence of human groups genetically separating from one another.

They found that the ancestors of the KhoiSan, hunter­gatherers living today in southern Africa, began to split off from other living humans about 200,000 years ago and were fully isolated by 100,000 years ago.

Earlier studies had estimated that the split between living groups of humans occurred much more recently. The new findings indicate that our ancestors already had evolved behaviors seen in living humans, such as language, 200,000 years ago.

Dr. Reich and his colleagues then investigated whether people in Australia and Papua New Guinea descended from an early wave of humans from Africa. They could find no evidence supporting that idea in the genomes.

The people of Australia and Papua New Guinea descended from the same expansion of Africans that produced Europeans and Asians, Dr. Reich’s team decided

Working with a separate set of genomes, Dr. Willerslev and his colleagues came to much the same conclusion. “The vast majority of their ancestry — if not all of it — is coming from the same out­of­Africa wave as Europeans and Asians,” said Dr. Willerslev.

Dr. Metspalu and his colleagues ended up with a somewhat different result when they looked at the Estonian Biocentre data.

They compared chunks of DNA from different genomes to see how long ago people inherited them from a common ancestor.

Almost all the DNA from non­Africans today could be traced back to one population that lived about 75,000 years ago — presumably a group of Africans who eventually left the continent and settled the rest of the world. That squares with the conclusions of the other two studies.

 

But in Papua New Guinea, Dr. Metspalu and his colleagues found, the story was a little different. They could trace 98 percent of each person’s DNA to that 75,000­year­old group. But the other 2 percent was much older.

Some people in Papua New Guinea — but no one else in the analyses — may carry a trace of DNA from a much older wave of Africans who left the continent as long as 140,000 years ago, and then vanished.

 

The second wave — the one from which the rest of the world descends — departed over 60,000 years later, the researchers suggest. The ancestors of the people of Papua New Guinea interbred with those first pioneers on their way east, which is why their descendants carry remarkable DNA.

 

Why leave Africa at all? Scientists have found some clues as to that mystery, too.

 

In a fourth paper in Nature, researchers described a computer model of Earth’s recent climatic and ecological history. It shows that changing rainfall patterns periodically opened up corridors from Africa into Eurasia that humans may have followed in search of food.

 

Huw Groucutt, an archaeologist at the University of Oxford, criticized the new studies as too simplistic. It’s incorrect, he said, to try to split non­Africans into just two distinct groups — one 120,000 years ago, and one closer to 50,000 years ago.

 

He suspects that there were several early waves from Africa, whose descendants combined into a complex gene pool. “It’s probably much more about populations expanding and contracting, fusing and separating,” said Dr. Groucutt.

Luca Pagani, a co­author of Dr. Metspalu at the University of Cambridge and the Estonian Biocentre, said that their findings suggest a population of early human pioneers were able to survive for tens of thousands of years.

 

But when the last wave came out of Africa, descendants of the first wave disappeared. Why?

 

“They may have not been technologically advanced, living in small groups,” Dr. Pagani said of the people of the early wave. “Maybe it was easy for a major later wave that was more successful to wipe them out.”