Dark Chocolate vs. Milk Chocolate which is better for you?

Many individuals have inquired as what is the differences in Dark Chocolate and Milk Chocolate

All Go Africa® products will always use Dark Chocolate and contain at least 70% cacao were applicable.

The Net – Net, is in the. U.S. Milk chocolate is the most popular type of chocolate in the United States.  To be marketed as milk chocolate, a product must contain at least 10 percent chocolate liquor, at least 3.39 percent milkfat, and at least 12 percent milk solids.

Thus, if you are consuming Milk Chocolate, you are basically consuming mostly sugar.

Dark chocolate (also known as black chocolate  or plain chocolate) is a form of chocolate which is made from cocoa butter instead of milk-based butter like milk chocolate, and contains a higher percentage of cocoa. Government and industry standards of what products may be labeled “dark chocolate” vary by country and market.

 

Dark chocolate contains antioxidants, such as polyphenols, and is relatively low in sugar. It has a reputation as a healthier alternative to other types of chocolate, such as milk chocolate. Dark chocolate has been identified as a potential “superfood”. This has helped lead to a global increase in demand for dark chocolate

 

Milk chocolate is solid chocolate made with milk, in the form of milk powder, liquid milk, or condensed milk, added. In 1875, Swiss confectioner Daniel Peter, in cooperation with his neighbour Henri Nestlé in Vevey, developed the first solid milk chocolate using condensed milk. The bar was named “Gala Peter”, combining the Greek word for “milk” and his name. A German company Jordan & Timaeus in Dresden, Saxony had already invented milk chocolate in 1839; hitherto it had only been available as a drink The US Government requires a 10% concentration of chocolate liquor. EU regulations specify a minimum of 25% cocoa solids. However, an agreement was reached in 2000 that allowed what by exception from these regulations is called “milk chocolate” in the UK, Ireland, and Malta, containing only 20% cocoa solids, to be traded as “family milk chocolate” elsewhere in the European Union.

 

Chocolate liquor (cocoa liquor) is pure cocoa mass in solid or semi-solid form. Like the cocoa beans (nibs) from which it is produced, it contains both cocoa solids and cocoa butter in roughly equal proportion.

It is produced from cocoa beans that have been fermented, dried, roasted, and separated from their skins. The beans are ground into cocoa mass (cocoa paste). The mass is melted to become the liquor, and the liquor is either separated into cocoa solids and cocoa butter, or cooled and molded into blocks of raw chocolate. Its main use (often with additional cocoa butter) is in making chocolate.

The name liquor is used not in the sense of a distilled, alcoholic substance, but rather the older meaning of the word, meaning ‘liquid’ or ‘fluid’.

Chocolate liquor contains roughly 53 percent cocoa butter (fat), about 17 percent carbohydrates, 11 percent protein, 6 percent tannins, and 1.5 percent theobromine.

Chocolate Production

To make 1 kg (2.2 lb) of chocolate, about 300 to 600 beans are processed, depending on the desired cocoa content. In a factory, the beans are roasted. Next, they are cracked and then deshelled by a “winnower”. The resulting pieces of beans are called nibs. They are sometimes sold in small packages at specialty stores and markets to be used in cooking, snacking, and chocolate dishes. Since nibs are directly from the cocoa tree, they contain high amounts of theobromine. Most nibs are ground, using various methods, into a thick, creamy paste, known as chocolate liquor or cocoa paste. This “liquor” is then further processed into chocolate by mixing in (more) cocoa butter and sugar (and sometimes vanilla and lecithin as an emulsifier), and then refined, conched and tempered. Alternatively, it can be separated into cocoa powder and cocoa butter using a hydraulic press or the Broma process. This process produces around 50% cocoa butter and 50% cocoa powder. cocoa powder has a fat content around 10–12%. Cocoa butter is used in chocolate bar manufacture, other confectionery, soaps, and cosmetics.

 

Treating with alkali produces Dutch-process cocoa powder, which is less acidic, darker, and more mellow in flavor than what is generally available in most of the world. Regular (nonalkalized) cocoa is acidic, so when cocoa is treated with an alkaline ingredient, generally potassium carbonate, the pH increases. This process can be done at various stages during manufacturing, including during nib treatment, liquor treatment, or press cake treatment.

Another process that helps develop the flavor is roasting, which can be done on the whole bean before shelling or on the nib after shelling. The time and temperature of the roast affect the result: A “low roast” produces a more acid, aromatic flavor, while a high roast gives a more intense, bitter flavor lacking complex flavor notes

Important Production Facts about cacao (Cocoa)

Production of cacao

The cocoa bean, also called cacao bean,[cocoa (/ˈkoʊ.koʊ/), and cacao (/kəˈkaʊ/), is the dried and fully fermented seed of Theobroma cacao, from which cocoa solids and, because of the seed’s fat, cocoa butter can be extracted. The beans are the basis of chocolate,

As of 2011, Cote d’Ivoire in is the largest producer of Cacao (Cocoa) in the World

Two African nations, Ivory Coast and Ghana, produce almost half of the world’s cocoa, with 1.448 and 0.835 million tonnes, respectively (31.6% and 18.22%, respectively)

 

Top cocoa bean producers
in 2013
(million metric tons)
 Ivory Coast 1.448
 Ghana 0.835
 Indonesia 0.777
 Nigeria 0.367
 Cameroon 0.275
 Brazil 0.256
 Ecuador 0.128
 Mexico 0.082
 Peru 0.071
 Dominican Republic 0.068
World total 4.585
Source:
UN Food & Agriculture Organisation
(FAO)
[1]

Production of Cacao  

A cocoa pod (fruit) has a rough, leathery rind about 2 to 3 cm (0.79 to 1.18 in) thick (this varies with the origin and variety of pod) filled with sweet, mucilaginous pulp (called baba de cacao in South America) with a lemonade-like taste enclosing 30 to 50 large seeds that are fairly soft and a pale lavender to dark brownish purple color.

During harvest, the pods are opened, the seeds are kept, and the empty pods are discarded. The seeds are placed where they can ferment. Due to heat buildup in the fermentation process, cacao beans lose most of the purplish hue and become mostly brown in color, with an adhered skin which includes the dried remains of the fruity pulp. This skin is released easily after roasting by winnowing. White seeds are found in some rare varieties, usually mixed with purples, and are considered of higher value.

Harvesting  

Cocoa trees grow in hot, rainy tropical areas within 20° of latitude from the Equator. Cocoa harvest is not restricted to one period per year and a harvest typically occurs over several months. In fact, in many countries, cocoa can be harvested at any time of the year.[20] Pesticides are often applied to the trees to combat capsid bugs, and fungicides to fight black pod disease.

 

Immature cocoa pods have a variety of colours, but most often are green, red, or purple, and as they mature, their colour tends towards yellow or orange, particularly in the creases  Unlike most fruiting trees, the cacao pod grows directly from the trunk or large branch of a tree rather than from the end of a branch, similar to jackfruit. This makes harvesting by hand easier as most of the pods will not be up in the higher branches. The pods on a tree do not ripen together; harvesting needs to be done periodically through the year.[20] Harvesting occurs between three and four times weekly during the harvest season.

The ripe and near-ripe pods, as judged by their colour, are harvested from the trunk and branches of the cocoa tree with a curved knife on a long pole. Care must be used when cutting the stem of the pod to avoid damaging the junction of the stem with the tree, as this is where future flowers and pods will emerg] One person can harvest an estimated 650 pods per day.

Harvesting & Processing.

 

Special note: the long-term goal is for Cacao Producing countries in Africa to fully roast process their products into bars, bricks & related by products in order to benefit fully from the economic value of their commodities.

The harvested pods are opened, typically with a machete, to expose the beans. The pulp and cocoa seeds are removed and the rind is discarded. The pulp and seeds are then piled in heaps, placed in bins, or laid out on grates for several days. During this time, the seeds and pulp undergo “sweating”, where the thick pulp liquefies as it ferments. The fermented pulp trickles away, leaving cocoa seeds behind to be collected. Sweating is important for the quality of the beans, which originally have a strong, bitter taste. If sweating is interrupted, the resulting cocoa may be ruined; if underdone, the cocoa seed maintains a flavor similar to raw potatoes and becomes susceptible to mildew. Some cocoa-producing countries distill alcoholic spirits using the liquefied pulp.

 

A typical pod contains 20 to 50 beans and about 400 dried beans are required to make one pound (880 per kilogram) of chocolate. Cocoa pods weigh an average of 400 g (14 oz) and each one yields 35 to 40 g (1.2 to 1.4 oz) dried beans; this yield is 40–44% of the total weight in the pod. One person can separate the beans from about 2000 pods per day.

The wet beans are then transported to a facility so they can be fermented and dried. They are fermented for four to seven days and must be mixed every two days.  They are dried for five to 14 days, depending on the climate conditions. The fermented beans are dried by spreading them out over a large surface and constantly raking them. In large plantations, this is done on huge trays under the sun or by using artificial heat. Small plantations may dry their harvest on little trays or on cowhides. Finally, the beans are trodden and shuffled about (often using bare human feet) and sometimes, during this process, red clay mixed with water is sprinkled over the beans to obtain a finer color, polish, and protection against molds during shipment to factories in the United States, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and other countries. Drying in the sun is preferable to drying by artificial means, as no extraneous flavors such as smoke or oil are introduced which might otherwise taint the flavor.

The beans should be dry for shipment (usually by sea). Traditionally exported in jute bags, over the last decade, beans are increasingly shipped in “mega-bulk” parcels of several thousand tonnes at a time on ships, or in smaller lots around 25 tonnes in 20-ft containers. Shipping in bulk significantly reduces handling costs; shipment in bags, however, either in a ship’s hold or in containers, is still common.

Interesting details about the Cashew and its uses throughout the World.

Interesting details about the Cashew and its uses throughout the World.

We have received many questions about the cashew. Thus, we have complied some information to help better understand the Cashew:

The Cashew is comprised of the following:

  • The Cashew Tree
  • The Cashew Fruit or Cashew Apple
  • The cashew nut (resides inside of the Cashew Fruit)
  • Cashew Shell
  • Cashew Shell Oil

The cashew tree (Anacardium occidentale) is a tropical evergreen tree that produces the cashew seed and the cashew apple.[1] It can grow as high as 14 m (46 ft), but the dwarf cashew, growing up to 6 m (20 ft), has proved more profitable, with earlier maturity and higher yields.

 

The species is originally native to northeastern Brazil  Portuguese colonists in Brazil began exporting cashew nuts as early as the 1550s.  Major production of cashews occurs in Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast), Vietnam, Nigeria, and India.

 

The cashew nut, often simply called a cashew, is widely consumed. It is eaten on its own, used in recipes, or processed into cashew cheese or cashew butter.

The shell of the cashew seed yields derivatives that can be used in many applications including lubricants, waterproofing, paints, and arms production, starting in World War II.

The cashew apple is a light reddish to yellow fruit, whose pulp can be processed into a sweet, astringent fruit drink or distilled into liquor.

 

The cashew apple, also called cashew fruit, is the fleshy part of the cashew fruit attached to the cashew nut. The top end of the cashew apple is attached to the stem that comes off the tree. The bottom end of the cashew apple attaches to the cashew nut, which is encased in a shell. In botanical terms, the cashew apple is an accessory fruit that grows on the cashew seed (which is the nut).

The cashew apple can be eaten fresh, cooked in curries, or fermented into vinegar, as well as an alcoholic drink. It is also used to make preserves, chutneys, and jams in some countries such as India and Brazil. In many countries, particularly in South America, the cashew apple is used to flavor drinks, both alcoholic and nonalcoholic.

Cashew nuts are more widely traded than cashew apples, because the apple, unlike the nut, is easily bruised and has very limited shelf life Cashew apple juice, however, may be used for manufacturing blended juices.

Culinary uses for cashew seeds in snacking and cooking are similar to those for all tree seeds called nuts.

Cashew nuts are commonly used in Indian cuisine, whole for garnishing sweets or curries, or ground into a paste that forms a base of sauces for curries (e.g., korma), or some sweets (e.g., kaju barfi). It is also used in powdered form in the preparation of several Indian sweets and desserts.

In Goan cuisine, both roasted and raw kernels are used whole for making curries and sweets. Cashew nuts are also used in Thai and Chinese cuisines, generally in whole form.

In the Philippines, cashew is a known product of Antipolo, and is eaten with suman. Pampanga also has a sweet dessert called turrones de casuy, which is cashew marzipan wrapped in white wafers. In Indonesia, roasted and salted cashew nut is called kacang mete or kacang mede, while the cashew apple is called jambu monyet (translates in English to monkey rose apple).

In Mozambique, bolo polana is a cake prepared using powdered cashews and mashed potatoes as the main ingredients. This dessert is popular in South Africa.

Important Production Facts about Cashews

Below are some interesting details regarding the current production of Cashews throughout the world

Production of Cashews

As of 2017, Cote d’Ivoire  is the largest producer of Cashews in the World

In 2015, global production of cashew nuts (as the kernel) was 738,861 tonnes, led by India and Côte d’Ivoire each with 23% of the world total (table). Vietnam and Brazil also had significant production of cashew kernels.

In 2014, rapid growth of cashew cultivation in Côte d’Ivoire made this country the top African exporter.[14] Fluctuations in world market prices, poor working conditions, and low pay for local harvesting have caused discontent in the cashew nut industry

Mr Edgar Maokola-Majogo, acting President African Cashew Alliance (ACA), on Tuesday said Africa was the largest producer of raw cashew nuts in the world with an estimated annual output of 1.2 million metric tons as of March 23, 2016

Production Regions in Africa

Cashew trees are widely cultivated for their nuts and derived products in West, East and South Africa. The West Africa region is producing at almost the same level as South Asian countries, while East Africa is currently facing a decline in the production of cashews.

Major cashew nut producing countries in Africa are Nigeria, Ghana, Gambia, Mali, Côte d’Ivoire, and Benin. Less than 10% of the raw cashew produced in the region is processed locally.

Production challenges

Most of the Cashews in Africa are processed locally thus, depriving the local economies of the value add of their products.

The local processing industry consists of industrial processors, mainly targeting the bulk export market and semi-industrial facilities that sell mainly in local markets and cottage processors. The informal groups process irregularly without investments in equipment and buildings and sell locally. The processing capacity of the industrial processors is said to be more than 1,000 million metric tons of raw nuts/year.

Africa produces around 40% of the estimated 2.6 million metric tons of raw cashew product worldwide every year. 

African nations set to approve huge free trade deal (CNN)

  @AlannaPetroff

The African continent is on the cusp of something big.

Fifty-five nations are negotiating a free trade deal that will cover more than 1.2 billion people across Africa, from Morocco all the way to South Africa.

Their leaders are planning to give political backing to the deal in late March, and launch a free trade zone for goods and services before the end of 2018, according to a spokesperson for the African Union, an organization that represents all 55 countries.

The Continental Free Trade Area (CFTA) could eventually be extended to create common policies on investment, competition and intellectual property.

It covers economies with a combined GDP of around $3.4 trillion.

The deal is designed to replace a patchwork of smaller trade agreements and bring countries closer together, following the pattern set by the European Union.

Like the EU, African nations hope one day to allow the free movement of people across the continent. An African central bank and single currency could follow within 10 years, said Prudence Sebahizi, the CFTA’s chief technical adviser.

Analysts are still crunching the numbers for what the CFTA means for economic growth and prosperity. The United Nations estimated in 2012 that the CFTA could boost trade within Africa by about 50% over the course of a decade.

Growth is very uneven across the continent and has generally slowed over the past few years, down to 3.5% in 2017 from a recent peak of 7% in 2012, according to the International Monetary Fund. It is forecast to rise in the coming years, but not by much.

“The potential for the agreement to support the continent’s development is huge,” said Danae Kyriakopoulou, chief economist at the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF), a financial think tank in London

Two of the biggest economies — Nigeria and South Africa — support the deal, according to the African Union, which works to promote economic and political integration. Nigeria is chairing the negotiations while South Africa has sent big delegations to each round of talks, it added.

But some experts are cautious about the prospects for success.

John Ashbourne, an Africa economist at Capital Economics, is a self-professed CFTA skeptic. He worries that the free trade zone could be “unworkably large” and may have limited benefits.

“While tariffs are a big problem, there are also very tangible reasons why intra-Africa trade is low. The infrastructure needed to facilitate intra-regional trade is poor, and most countries don’t produce many finished goods that their neighbors want,” he said.

That’s reflected in relatively weak trade ties between African countries.

“In absolute terms, African countries traded almost twice as much with the European Union as they did with each other in 2016,” said the OMFIF’s Kyriakopoulou. “This defies one of the principles of trade economics: that proximity matters.”

In a recent article in the Financial Times, Niger’s President Mahamadou Issoufou listed several obstacles to boosting continental trade, including “border delays, burdensome customs and inspection procedures.”

But the potential rewards are simply too big to ignore, he added.

“With the continent’s economy expected to grow to $29 trillion by 2050, the CFTA may evolve to cover a market that is larger than NAFTA today,” he wrote, referring to the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Canada and Mexico.

see CNN for more information http://money.cnn.com/2018/01/19/news/economy/africa-free-trade-deal-cfta/

 

What kind of coffee is produced in Africa?

Try Go Africa Coffee. The lowest Priced premium Coffee Avaible on amazon.com and at www.GoAfricaStore.com
__
What kind of coffee is produced in Africa?
Most African countries produce Robusta coffee, with a few having a mix of both Robusta and Arabica varieties. Countries producing Arabica coffee, especially the Colombian Mild will have a windfall in export earnings, which may lead to increased investments to boost output.
african coffee growing regions

Africa is home to many of the finest African coffee beans in the world, fromEthiopia and Kenya in the East to Rwanda where top quality Arabica beans are cultivated to West African countries including Senegal and Cameroon where robusta coffee beans are mostly grown.

We’ll look briefly at some of the regions in this article: Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi. Though to be fair, coffee beans from Africaare widely cultivated throughout the continent, and even grows wild in many areas.

Ethiopia: Harrar, Ghimbi and Yirgacheffe

Ethiopia has three main regions that produce African coffee beans: Harrar, Ghimbi and Sidamo, or Yirgacheffe. Harrar beans come from small farms and are dry-processed. They are labeled “longberry” for large and “shortberry” for small or Mocha (which is the size of a peaberry).

The Ethiopian coffee has a strong dry edge, wine-like to fruity acidity, a rich aroma and heavy in body. In the best crops, you can smell blueberries or blackberries. Ethiopian is often used in espresso blends in order the capture the aromatics in the crema (the thin layer of foam atop an espresso).

Ghimi and Yirgacheffe produce washed coffees. The Ghimbi beans grown in western parts are more balanced, heavier and longer lasting body than the Harrars. The Yirgacheffe coffee bean is the most flavored of all the Ethiopian beans, grown in the southern part of the country. Mild, fruity and aromatic, you may see it labeled Sidamo, which refers to the district where it is grown and harvested.

Uganda: Shade grown

Uganda produces mostly Robusta beans that are typically used in instant coffees but the Arabica beans it does produce are similar to Kenyan coffee. The best Ugandan coffee comes from the western slopes of Mt. Elgon called Bugishu.

Robusta has been in Uganda for centuries and wild varieties of it still grow in Uganda’s rain forests. Both Robusta and Arabica trees are grown in the shade of banana trees and harvested about twice a year. 300,000 farmers grow coffee, which makes up 95% of the country’s exports.

Ugandan farmers grow mostly Robusta since it is easier for farmers with little money for equipment and none to hire help. The more well-off farmers can afford to farm Arabica, which is more work and more expensive but also pays off better. Ugandan Arabica is of medium intensity, sweet with a hint of the rustic, has a good body that is husky yet clean and makes an interesting espresso.coffee-2lbs-back-FOR-AMAZON-product-mockup coffee-2lbs-front-FOR-AMAZON-product-mockup

20 Things You Didn’t Know About… Coffee (discover.com)

Try Go Africa Coffee. Go Africa Coffee is sold exclusively on Amazon nationwide. You can reach is at coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or 646-502-9778 ext 8004 or at www.GoAfricaStore.com

or at https://www.amazon.com/Go-Africa-Coffee-Whole-Bean/dp/B01FPXJAJI/ref=sr_1_2_s_it?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1470347389&sr=1-2&keywords=go+africa+coffee

__

1. Forget 5-Hour Energy. The original pick-me-up may have come from the nomadic Oromo of Ethiopia, who made energy bars from ground coffee beans and animal fat sometime in the first millennium.

2.
Around A.D. 1000, Arab traders brought coffee beans home from Africa and started boiling them into a drink they called qahwa. Translation: “that which prevents sleep.”

3.
Fast-forward to the 1930s, when German physician Max Gerson began promoting daily coffee enemas to detoxify the liver, stimulate metabolism, and cure cancers.

4.
More recently, Britain’s Prince Charles has raved about coffee enemas, and Amazon.com sells DIY kits.

5.
But be warned: The National Cancer Institute says Gerson’s claims are unsupported, and the American Cancer Society cautions that illness and death can result from contaminated coffee enema equipment, depleted electrolytes, and punctured intestinal walls.

6.
Have a cup instead. In 2011, the Harvard School of Public Health reported that in a 22-year study of nearly 48,000 men, those drinking six or more cups daily were about 60 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer.

7.
A 2008 study at Sweden’s Lund University demonstrated that drinking coffee lowers the risk of breast cancer, at least for women who have a relatively common variant of the gene CYP1A2, which helps to metabolize both estrogen and coffee.

8.
But what really grabbed the public’s attention that year was cup size. The same Swedish team found a correlation between women with the genetic variation who drink three or more cups of coffee a day and smaller breasts.

9.
Volume may be the least of coffee drinkers’ worries. In 2009, psychologists from the U.K.’s Durham University observed that students who drank three cups daily were three times more likely to hear voices and have out-of-body experiences.

 0. Bach voiced his love of coffee in a cantata. With libretto by Christian Friedrich Henrici, the Kaffeekantatewas first performed in Leipzig, Germany, sometime between 1732 and 1735.

11.
 “Father, don’t be so severe! / If I can’t drink / My bowl of coffee three times daily / Then in my torment I will shrivel up / Like a piece of roast goat,”

By Rebecca Coffey|Monday, September 29, 2014

espresso
nimon / Shutterstock

1. Forget 5-Hour Energy. The original pick-me-up may have come from the nomadic Oromo of Ethiopia, who made energy bars from ground coffee beans and animal fat sometime in the first millennium.

2.
Around A.D. 1000, Arab traders brought coffee beans home from Africa and started boiling them into a drink they called qahwa. Translation: “that which prevents sleep.”

3.
Fast-forward to the 1930s, when German physician Max Gerson began promoting daily coffee enemas to detoxify the liver, stimulate metabolism, and cure cancers.

4.
More recently, Britain’s Prince Charles has raved about coffee enemas, and Amazon.com sells DIY kits.

5.
But be warned: The National Cancer Institute says Gerson’s claims are unsupported, and the American Cancer Society cautions that illness and death can result from contaminated coffee enema equipment, depleted electrolytes, and punctured intestinal walls.

6.
Have a cup instead. In 2011, the Harvard School of Public Health reported that in a 22-year study of nearly 48,000 men, those drinking six or more cups daily were about 60 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer.

7.
A 2008 study at Sweden’s Lund University demonstrated that drinking coffee lowers the risk of breast cancer, at least for women who have a relatively common variant of the gene CYP1A2, which helps to metabolize both estrogen and coffee.

8.
But what really grabbed the public’s attention that year was cup size. The same Swedish team found a correlation between women with the genetic variation who drink three or more cups of coffee a day and smaller breasts.

9.
Volume may be the least of coffee drinkers’ worries. In 2009, psychologists from the U.K.’s Durham University observed that students who drank three cups daily were three times more likely to hear voices and have out-of-body experiences.

coffee-beans
10. Bach voiced his love of coffee in a cantata. With libretto by Christian Friedrich Henrici, the Kaffeekantatewas first performed in Leipzig, Germany, sometime between 1732 and 1735.

11.
 “Father, don’t be so severe! / If I can’t drink / My bowl of coffee three times daily / Then in my torment I will shrivel up / Like a piece of roast goat,” goes the soprano part.

12.
 Americans, too, sing coffee’s praise. According to Harvard research, Americans spend $40 billion on coffee each year.

13.
 The world consumes close to 1.6 billion cups of coffee every day.

14.
 A global phenomenon, the grande (or medium) 16-ounce coffee at Starbucks contains the caffeine equivalent of 9.5 cans of Coke.

15.
 It takes approximately 4,700 ounces, or 37 gallons, of water to make just one cup of coffee when you account for inputs needed to grow and process the beans.

16.
 Researchers from London’s Royal Botanic Gardens warn that highland forests in Ethiopia and South Sudan, where most wild coffee grows, are disappearing as mountaintops warm. By 2080, these moist ecosystems may be gone. It’s cause for concern, but not the end of coffee. The domesticated plant varieties we rely on for our joe are generally secure.

17.
 That is, until they are threatened by disease. Nearly 70 percent of the coffee we drink today comes from offshoots of wild Arabica, or Coffea arabica—the coffee species that stores most of the genetic information we need to re-engineer commercial cultivars.
 18. Coffea charrieriana, found in Cameroon, is the only known naturally decaffeinated coffee.

19.
 Coffee cherries—the fruit that bears our beloved beans—are a favorite snack of elephants, and the beans, or seeds, can be harvested, already hulled, from their dung. Smooth and caramel-tasting, elephant-dung coffee has been known to sell for $500 a pound.

20.
 Think coffee makes your breath smell bad? In 2009 researchers at Tel Aviv University found that adding coffee to a dish of saliva inhibited the growth of a bacterium that causes halitosis. So go ahead, take a coffee break.
coffee-1lb-back-FOR-AMAZON-product-mockup coffee-1lb-front-FOR-AMAZON-product-mockup

We are pleased to annouce the availablity of Go Africa Coffee execlusively on Amazon.com

Looking for Premium, high quality, Africa Coffee at an affordable price. Look no further.

We are pleased to announce the availability of Go Africa Coffee exclusively on Amazon and also via the Go Africa Store. www.GoAfricaStore.com via Amazon.

Go Africa Coffee is now available nationwide…

https://www.amazon.com/Go-Africa-Coffee-Whole-Bean/dp/B01FPMOC2E?ie=UTF8&*Version*=1&*entries*=0

 

 

Go Africa Coffee is a unique blend of ancestral roasting and processing techniques handed down by Africans for over 2,000 years in order to yield the optimal balance of flavor, taste, and aroma while also appreciating the value of wisdom of our culture and traditions to produce a product that is timeless and eternal.

We are one (English), Simunye (Zulu), Sisi ni moja (Swahili) , Anyị bụ otu (Igbo),  نحن واحد (Arabic), Ambehé mogo kéléyé (Mandingo), Nous sommes un (French).

Go Africa is 100% Gourmet Coffee from one or more of following countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d’Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo).

___

Welcome to the Go Africa Coffee Product launch. Go Africa Coffee is sold exclusively on Amazon nationwide in the U.S. and throughout North America. Go Africa Coffee is a premium blend of coffee sold at an affordable and competitive price. We hope that you enjoy our product.

Thank you for your ongoing support, there is more to come.

Sincerely, the Go Africa Team.

You can reach is at coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or 646-502-9778 ext 8004 or at wwww.GoAfricaStore.com

Accra, Ghana becomes next smart African city to offer Uber (IT News Africa)

Accra has been named as the next city to join Uber’s network in Africa. The economically vibrant hub is the first city in Ghana to receive the service. With a thriving urban population, Accra’s 2.27 million people will have access to efficient transport through the ride-sharing platform.  Uber is excited to explore the potential of this dynamic city.

By Staff Writer (IT News Africa)

Alon Lits, General Manager for Uber Sub-Saharan Africa says, “Accra is bustling, connected city that Uber is proud to be launching in. It’s rapid growth and multiple ethnic communities make it an exciting place to introduce our service.”

“At Uber, we bring the world closer together by connecting global citizens to transport in a growing number of cities. We see Accra as a natural fit, because its people are willing to embrace innovation and technology and love products that are cool, exclusive and offer a new experience. We are able to deliver just that, safely, reliably and affordably.”

Uber recently launched it’s service in Uganda in the city of Kampala.

Read More at IT News Africa 

Ethiopian Airlines Launches Shortest Flight to New York From Lagos Nigeria (AllAfrica)

Ethiopian Airlines has announced the introduction of its 12-hour flight from Lagos to New York which is the shortest flight duration to the destination.

Ethiopian Airlines.

General Manager of Ethiopian Airlines, Nigeria, Mr. Solomon Begashaw, who made this known in Abuja on Thursday at the celebration of the airline’s 70th anniversary, said the flight route is in collaboration with Asky Airlines with passengers going through Lomè, Togo before they connect to New York.

Read More at AllAfrica.com